One month ago, I started the co-working journey in Hoi An, Vietnam. I like to find cafes where I can work, but sometimes it’s nice to have co-working space. Not only to get my work done but also to meet like-minded people and to feel inspired by other stories.

So a bit about myself, I don’t think I mentioned yet what I am doing actually. I freelance in:
– Photographing. (mostly travel related, food, restaurants, hotels and accommodations)
– Editing work. (photography and video editing)
– Blogging for travel-related companies.

So, if you need someone to help you out workwise, let me know!

In this blog, I will share my personal experiences with the Hub, my co-working place in Hoi An.
    

About the Co-working space

There is one co-working place in Hoi An, named the Hub Hoi An. The workspace is open 24 hours, they have a meeting room, a quiet room and an airconditioning room. You also can work in the garden. There is a printer, monitors and free water and tea. You also have different discounts when you’re a member. (discounts on yoga, sports and massage places). When you go for the monthly pass, you can have one free drink a day.

 
There are more places where you work, but most of them are more cafes and it can be busy. I collected the best work cafes in Hoi An: 

Work cafes Hoi An

I also wrote a digital nomad guide with everything you should know if you’re thinking about working as a digital nomad in Hoi An. The guide also involves information about everything you should know when you consider living there for a while, so check it out!

DIGITAL NOMAD GUIDE CANGGU

I choose to work in Hub Hoi An. A working space, a bit outside the centre, close to the beach and surrounded by rice fields. This place attracted me because of the garden and the reliable wifi, what isn’t always that good in Hoi An. When I arrived I noticed that this co-working space had a strong community. There were daily member lunches, events and weekly dinners. If you want to see the site, just click the button below. (it’s no affiliate link, just for your information 🙂 )

INFO ABOUT HUB Hoi An

 
Costes

The costs are depending on how many hours you would like to spend in the coworking space. You have a couple options in the Hub. A day pass, a week pass (8 days) and a month pass.

The prices at the moment:
Day pass:  210.000 Dong / $ 9 (only access from 9 till 7 pm)
Week pass: 
1.3 million dong/ $ 57 (24 hours access)
Month pass: 4 million dong/$175 (24 hours access)

The payments can be in cash (dong) or with your credit card.

The pros of the Hub co-working:

-Good wifi and different spaces open for 24 hours

There is a meeting room, a quiet room, workspaces outside, a garden table and an airconditioning room. The wifi is strong, 60 MPs and reliable. I really liked the coffee and the food in the restaurant offers vegan options and healthy as well. The reception hours are only till 5, so you will get a key for 24 hours access. It’s also nice that there is free water and tea.

-There is a strong community feeling.

What I liked about this place is definitely the community feeling. After work, I regularly eat with people from the place, had some business opportunities and love the fact that everyone was really open and in for a chat.

– There are a lot of weekly events.
Like yoga, teaching classes, game nights and weekly dinners. When I was there the Christmas brunch was definitely a highlight.

Life in Vietnam is quite cheap & it’s nicely located.
The Hub is close to the beach, just a 10-minute bike ride from the city and 45 minutes from Danang. It’s a perfect place to work when you’re travelling in Vietnam or just need a place to stay for a while to save some money.

  

The cons of the Hub co-working:

About the working spaces:
-The place is really small, therefore it feels really crowded. (max 25 people)
– There are no skype boots, only a meeting room, but sometimes it’s already reserved and then you don’t have other options.
– The chairs aren’t that comfortable.
In my opinion, it’s too expensive for what you get compared to other co-working spaces over the world.

In general: 
– I miss flexibility in the passes, There is no 3-day pass or a pass for internet use an hour.
– They didn’t organise getaways or something to explore the area with the members.
– The cafe is closed on the weekends and during the day only open till 4 pm.
– The cafe was a bit pricy in comparison to other cafes.
A personal one, I didn’t like Hoi An that much for long term It’s nice and cosy, but it can be a bit boring after a couple weeks.

My story with Co-working in the Hub

I liked working here as a member, I stayed here one month to work for myself, but after a couple weeks I talked with the owner about volunteering options for the Hub and I took the position as a community manager for a month. (I always like to try new things)
I worked for 3 days a week, got free accommodation, food during the working days and was able to use the co-working space in my free time.

As a community manager, I helped with the coffee making, administration, events and social media. (they got finally over the 1000 followers, glad that I could be part of it to help). I really liked this work and it saved me a lot of fo money! I also liked the fact that I was able to see how everything works. I worked before as an assistant manager in a hotel, so that made this quite easy for me with my previous experiences. But, I learned new skills, a bit of Vietnamese cooking and it was a fun experience overall!

Overall, I  liked working in the co-working space. The people were really nice, I got 2 freelance jobs out of it and a volunteering job. However, Hoi An isn’t the place for the long term for me. I wasn’t lucky with the weather (I somehow thought it was a good idea to travel there during rain-season.., but mostly because it’s a bit to farmer life for me. 

 

I noticed after this month that I like to work in co-working spaces, but not fulltime. I also like to discover cafes and work there. Oh, and don’t forget to check coworker.com if you would like to try out this working space, they offer a free day pass! 

Suzanne Schuringa

Author Suzanne Schuringa

More posts by Suzanne Schuringa

Leave a Reply